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Monday 8:00 am- 6:30 pm GMT
Tuesday 8:00 am- 6:30 pm GMT
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Thursday 8:00 am- 6:30 pm GMT
Friday 8:00 am- 6:30 pm GMT
Saturday 8:00 am- 2:00 pm GMT
Sunday 9:30 am- 6:30 pm GMT
Travel North by Train
Tour DC10

The Giants Causeway & Glens of Antrim

Follow in the footsteps of Giants!

Giants Causeway
Causeway Coast
Carrick a rede rope bridge
Dunluce Castle
The Giants Causeway
White Rocks
Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge
Dunluce Castle
Giants Causeway
Causeway Coast
Carrick a rede rope bridge
Dunluce Castle
What's included?
  • Return Rail Travel
  • Reserved Seats on the train
  • Railtours Ireland Host throughout
  • Visitor Attraction Admissions
  • Escorted Coach
Tour of Ireland Map - Belfast, Giant's Causeway
Overview & Map

Travel North by Train

A fascinating day out to the famed Antrim coast with its spectacular seascapes taking in the Giant's Causeway and Dunluce Castle. Rail travel Dublin - Belfast - Dublin by "Enterprise Express"

Full Itinerary
Full Day Tour:

Dublin to Belfast


Check-in is 20 minutes prior to Train Departure Time.

Customer Service Desk at Connolly Station where our Check-In representative will be in their yellow jacket!

Check in for 07:35 Departure from Connolly Station, which was built in 1844 as the terminus of the Dublin & Drogheda Railway and is now the administrative headquarters of Iarnród Éireann, Ireland’s National Railway. We depart northwards through the Dublin suburbs, which soon give way to farmland. Soon we pass the exclusive coastal village of Malahide before we cross the wide Broadmeadow Estuary, followed by Rogerstown Estuary. Fine views of the sea appear as we pass through the coastal town of Skerries, followed by the fishing village of Balbriggan. A few kilometres further on we pass Gormanston, an Irish Air Corps military airfield –on the landward side. Red flags on the seaward side indicate military exercises are in progress. We travel through Drogheda. Immediately north of Drogheda we cross the historic river Boyne by a magnificent viaduct, with great views of the town. It was here that Oliver Cromwell put the entire population to the sword in 1649. At little further upstream is the site of the Battle of the Boyne, where [Protestant] King William of Orange defeated dethroned [Catholic] King James in 1690 –an event which is still celebrated annually by ‘Orangemen’ or ‘Northern Protestants’ on the ‘Twelfth’ of July. We now begin to climb into the foothills of the Camlough Mountains and border country.

Arrive into Belfast, Ireland’s second largest city, we will take a coach for the tour to the Antrim Coast and the Giant’s Causeway. One of the city’s principal landmarks can be seen upon arrival, the two Harland & Wolfe Cranes which are nicknamed Samson and Goliath. It was here that many great ships were built, most notably for White Star Line, whose ships included the Olympic, Britannic and (perhaps the most famous ship of all), RMS Titanic.

Leaving Belfast we proceed to the town of Carrickfergus for a short photo-stop and take the coast road north from here. Further north we arrive at the fishing village of Carnlough, where we stop for about 15 minutes. We continue on passing the coastal villages of Glenariff, Cushendall and Cushendun. There are stunning views of the sea to the right and the mountains or the Glens of Antrim to the left. Most impressive are the spectacular views of Mull of Kintyre, Scotland which are clearly visible on a fine day. Moving inland, we come to the town of Ballycastle, home to Ireland’s oldest town fair. The Laamas fair dates from 1606 and takes place over the August bank holiday weekend every year.

Our next stop is the famous Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. We then head for Dunluce Castle for a photo stop before arriving at the Giant’s Causeway, where we stop for about 2 hours. Leaving the Giant’s Causeway, we head back to Belfast to return to Dublin.

Visitor Attraction Admissions included: Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge